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CONCLUSION 

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF QUARANTINE AND HOW TO REDUCE IT:
RAPID REVIEW OF THE EVIDENCE

After quarantine, many participants continued to engage in avoidance behaviors. For health-care workers, being quarantined was significantly and positively associated with avoidance behaviors, such as minimizing direct contact with patients and not reporting to work. 

HARD PASS.

So let's find out how to avoid it...

BUT FIRST LET'S GETA. WHAT'S THIS ALL ABOUT?

signs of

mental health issues

The CDC notes that people should look out for signs of distressed mental health in themselves and others. Symptoms may include: 

  • Fear and worry about your own health

  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns

  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrat

  • Worsening of chronic health problems

 

  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

What individuals can do

Break up your   d  a  y 

Find tasks to break up your day and, where possible, change your environment for different activities.

Take care of your body 

Eat healthily, get plenty of sleep and exercise daily. That could include conducting indoor workout classes, stretching and practicing meditation. 

Stay connected 

Make the most of technology and stay in touch with colleagues, friends and family via phone calls, texts, social media and video conferencing.

Limit media intake

Stay informed about the situation via reliable sources, but limit your news and social media intake to avoid feeling overwhelmed.

Fight boredom 

Make the most of catching up TV series, reading and exploring projects you have been putting off to beat boredom and stay mentally active.

Focus on the positives 

Amplify good news stories and honor caregivers working tirelessly to resolve the situation.

Take one day at a time — Try not to project too far into the future. Remember that these are temporary measures and you are not alone.

“Stay in contact with people

— virtually —

engage in activities that give you pleasure and a sense of meaning, and do what you can to help others, which is a remarkable antidote to depression.”

—Michael Friedman, associate professor at Columbia School of Social Work in New York

Half of what he said was totally about us

  • contact with people

  • virtually 

  • engage in activities

  • you

  • pleasure sense

  • you

  • help others

  • is ... remarkable

  • antidote to depression